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Catherine Lindell Selected as American Ornithological Society Fellow

Catherine Lindell was selected as a 2017 American Ornithological Society Fellow. American Ornithological Society Fellows are selected each year in recognition of their experience, commitment, and contributions to the field of ornithology and the society.

"I appreciate the official recognition of my contributions to the field of ornithology and to the American Ornithological Society," Lindell said. "It was especially nice to receive the honor at this year's American Ornithological Society/Society of Canadian Ornithologists meeting because it was held here at MSU, and I was a member of the Scientific Program Committee for the meeting." 

The Lindell lab investigates questions about the ecological roles birds play—and the ecosystem services they provide—in managed ecosystems including agricultural systems and those undergoing restoration.

“Catherine’s research exemplifies how we can use basic behavioral ecology to address important applied ecological challenges involving birds in agricultural landscapes,” explained Tom Getty, professor and chair of the Department of Integrative Biology in the College of Natural Science. “We are pleased and proud to see her receive this recognition for her many contributions to the field of ornithology in general, and to the American Ornithological Society in particular.

The American Ornithological Society is an international society devoted to the advancement of scientific understanding of birds, enriching ornithology as a profession, and promoting rigorous scientific basis for the conservation of birds.

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